CWEN/RFE Report on the Status of Women in Canadian Economics, 2015

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CWEN/RFE is pleased to release the 2015Report on the Status of Women in Canadian Economics. The report is based on our 2014/2015 survey of all Economics departments at degree granting institutions in Canada, combined with data we collected from departmental webpages and other sources.  It is part of CWEN/RFE’s continuing efforts to monitor the status and promote the advancement of women in the economics profession in Canada.

 

In summary, the report finds that women remain a smaller share of the academic economics workforce than they are of students studying economics, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Overall, roughly a quarter of permanent positions in Canadian economics departments are held by women. Over the past decade, there has been a considerable increase in the proportion of women at the Associate Professor level and at the Professor level, partly as a result of a pipeline effect. At the same time, however, the proportion of women at the Assistant Professor level has declined. This disturbing trend is not clearly evident in comparable US data, nor can it be traced back to a decline in the percentage of female graduating PhD students.

A full version (pdf) of the report can be found here: 2015 CWEN Report of the Status of Women in Canadian Economics.

2 thoughts on “CWEN/RFE Report on the Status of Women in Canadian Economics, 2015

  1. Hi, there seems to be an error on the abstract section.
    The author cites the pipeline effect as something that leads to an increase in the proportion of women at the associate professor and professor level. But the pipeline effect is something that is widely cited as decreasing the number of women in something, not increasing it.

    From Stanford:

    ‘The “hidden” problem – where to begin?

    The harder and more subtle problem to identify is characterized by the pipeline effect – the fact that as one progresses down the “pipe” of the study of computer science, more women quit earlier than men’

  2. Hi Lisa, I think the effect you refer to is called the “leaky pipeline”, while the meaning of the term “pipeline effect” is more general and depends on the context. Here, it means that if you have a relative increase in the proportion of women at the Assistant Professor level (a phenomenon we observed in Canada over the past decade), you’ll necessarily see an increase in subsequent years in female representation at the Associate and Full Professor level, as women climb up the academic career ladder.

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